yeast

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yeast

Postby mrbrooks » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:35 pm

I was wondering what type of yeast you guys are stocking up on and how your storing it too. Really if you have any bread making recipes please share, I am not doing so well. Guess I got to dependant on a bread machine!
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Re: yeast

Postby flgator » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:39 pm

I found some great recipes for quick bread, sourdough bread and flat bread from youtube, the visuals help immensely.
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Re: yeast

Postby Georgia_Grown » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:47 pm

mrbrooks wrote:I was wondering what type of yeast you guys are stocking up on and how your storing it too. Really if you have any bread making recipes please share, I am not doing so well. Guess I got to dependant on a bread machine!


Look up getting yeast from potatoes - cool research!

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Re: yeast

Postby dlh123 » Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:13 am

mrbrooks...........I found this link for bread that is so good and if you follow the clip step-by-step, take your time and you'll do well! ( I downloaded the video and just went step-by-step) It is for a soft french bread and I made it for the 1st time last week and loved it. It makes 2 large bread loaves and thought I could just freeze the 2nd one but it didn't taste nearly as good, obviously, as the fresh loaf. Next time I'll freeze the loaf before cooking it and see how that turns out. The link is here: http://joshlovesit.com/french-bread-recipes/ Also read the comments where he answers questions about using whole wheat, etc.

In regards to yeast. I have been testing various brands and comparing cost and I just ordered SAF yeast from Amazon, (4) 1 lb bags and in comparing to the small jars at the grocery stores, this was a much better deal. Read the comments to get ideas on storage as there is a difference of opinion whether yeast should be put in the freezer or not. If I can find a credible reference for you I will post it. Here's the link on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Instant-Yeast-1-P ... =saf+yeast
I'm also trying to experiement on making various types of bread so Ill share the recipes if I find some good ones. Good luck!
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Re: yeast

Postby mrbrooks » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:44 am

Thank you for the information and links guys.
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Re: yeast

Postby dholmes » Tue Sep 25, 2012 11:02 am

I'm not much on baking bread either. So far, I buy the little yeast packets at the store and put them in the freezer. Guess that's a gap in my pantry, huh?

Oh, try www.hillbillyhousewife.com for simple bread recipes - with and without yeast.
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Re: yeast

Postby PatchMomma » Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:50 pm

Yeast...I buy ours from Costco these days. I can get 2 pounds for $5. Our local bakery (a great one run by the local Mennonites) carries 1 lb bricks for about $3. They've been our good source for wheat as well. I store the bricks in the freezer and when I open one they go in canning jars, I keep the one I'm using at the time in the fridge.

Bread...if there's a long term situation your yeast will be used in no time. Heat and moisture do a number on it so it's definitely a limited resource. We'll all be loving flat breads and sourdoughs. LOL

Here's a basic white bread recipe, it's what we use for rolls, sandwiches, etc. This is my tried and true recipe.

If you're wanting whole wheat just let me know and I'll post a rockin' recipe I've got for that....it's great for those who don't normally like whole wheat.

BASIC WHITE BREAD

2 pkg. active dry yeast (I use 2 tbsp bulk yeast)
1 cup warm water
1 cup milk
3 tbsp sugar
2 1/2 tsp salt
3 tbsp butter
5 cups all-purpose flour

Here's my method. I put 3 cups of the flour in my bowl, add the sugar, salt and butter. Then I add 1 cup of the hottest tap water I can find, and then the 1 cup milk straight from the fridge. Mix these until you have a great smooth mixture, it'll be soupy, not doughy yet. I mix this batter for a good 5 minutes. After mixing your batter should be nice and warm, the milk will have cooled off that hot water. Add the yeast and mix for a minute. Then add the remaining flour a cup at a time. Once it's all come together turn it out onto a floured counter and start kneading. I knead a white loaf for a good 5 minutes or more. Your goal is to have dough that is soft but not sticky. It should be able to rest on the counter for a minute without sticking completely to it. Feel free to add a little flour as you knead if your dough is too moist. If you've added too much flour your dough will feel tough and dry bits may actually start falling off, you can always knead with wet hands to help this but it's always better to add too little flour than too much...easier to fix a sticky dough. The dough should feel soft, smooth and pliable.
Let dough rise in the bowl, covered with a cloth for 45 min to an hour. Check on it...if you push your finger in the dough and an indentation remains it's ready, meaning the yeast has done it's job and is basically too tired to fix that indentation...or at least that's what I tell my 6yo. LOL
Shape your dough into 2 loaves or rolls and set in buttered loaf pans or on a buttered sheet. Let rise 45 min. Bake at 350 for 40 min. Rolls only take about 15. I don't preheat my oven...the oven heating up allows the dough to rise some more.
*you can make cinnamon roll bread from this, or cheese/garlic loaves/rolls...they're awesome!
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Re: yeast

Postby mrbrooks » Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:49 pm

If I grind the wheat stored in buckets, do I have to do anything diffrent to it to use it or is it ready one grinded? Wait its pre ground so its ready right? Whats the hand held grinder for?

I will be trying out patchmomma's recipe this weekend (thank you for it) this weekend and will let you know how it goes!

Patchmomma: I did not get the comment "we will all be loving flatbread and sourdoughs"--- is that b/c we won't be able to store yeast long term, which if I am correct gives bread the "rise" and sourdough is only made by active yeast right? How long would an active yeast stay good. I've only done two breads (at christmas--fruit cakes) with them and ohhh they smelled awful, but tasted good:) I am thinking they would not stay good very long right?

Man, this topic is making my head hurt. We better not ever lose power, cause I am a bad enough cook now! I just want my bread!!
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Re: yeast

Postby flgator » Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:12 pm

All is not lost folks. Some time ago I found a wonderful blog a woman does about using yeast water - yeast she makes herself using various fruits!!
http://originalyeast.blogspot.com/2008/ ... water.html
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Re: yeast

Postby PatchMomma » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:30 pm

flgator, thanks for that link, I may have to play around with that!

mrbrooks, my comment about enjoying flatbreads and sourdoughs was because the yeast won't stay good forever. 2 years is about the shelf life. Personally I'd be fine just making tortillas all the time, in my opinion it's a better use of resources and flour which will also eventually run out....but when you've got a hankering for some fresh baked bread you've just gotta have it!

For whole wheat we use a manual grinder (Country Living Grain Mill) attached to a bicycle. We used hand power for a while and I'm too lazy to keep that up, it was hard work! LOL I get a grind I'm happy with, I like mine pretty fine, you don't want big chunks of wheat that can crack a tooth after it's baked into the bread. When making whole wheat bread nothing makes a better bread than fresh home ground wheat. Once it's ground I believe the quality goes down and the oils in the ground wheat will go rancid if stored too long, so we usually just grind what we're about to use and if there's excess store it in the fridge until it's needed.

If you're wanting to try homemade whole wheat bread I highly recommend this recipe, it's the only one I was ever happy with. It says to use a mixer but you can do this by hand, it's just more labor intensive. I couldn't get mine to knead properly in my Kitchen Aid so I ended up kneading for a solid 15 minutes...you can't skimp on kneading whole wheat bread or you won't get a nice light, smooth textured loaf. This is a copycat of Dave's Killer Bread.

DAVE'S KILLER BREAD RECIPE
Sponge

3 1/3 cups whole wheat flour

1/2 cup sugar

1 tbsp plus 1/2 tsp instant yeast

2 1/4 cups water

1 1/2 tbsp molasses

1 tbsp oil

Dough

3 1/3 cups whole wheat flour

1/4 cup vital wheat gluten

2 tsp salt

1. Sponge In bowl of stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine 3 1/3 cups whole wheat flour, sugar and yeast, mixing until combined. Add the water, molasses and oil to the flour, mixing until incorporated. Beat dough for 5 minutes on low. Cover bowl and set aside for one hour.

2. Dough: Add the remaining flour, gluten, salt to the sponge, beating until well mixed. If dough is too dry, you can add another tablespoon or two of water. Using the dough hook, if possible, beat the dough on medium high speed for 10 to 15 minutes. You should have a nice, smooth dough.

3. Cut the dough into two equal pieces, cover with a slightly damp towel and set it aside to let it rest for 15 minutes. Roll dough into a smooth log, making sure to get the air out. Repeat with remaining dough. Place shaped dough into greased pans and let proof until it begins to peak over the pan. Preheat oven to 350°F while bread is rising.

4. Let rise in pans about 1 hour, or until the dough has risen enough to really fill up the pan, and has crested over the top. Bake loaves in preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer reads 190°F.
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Re: yeast

Postby PatchMomma » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:35 pm

Oh, the fruitcakes....I missed that part.

I'm not sure about that one...I've never made one. My grandmother used to and she'd drench those puppies in rum for a while so I imagine they'd keep quite well. She'd hang onto them for a while anyway. ;)

Most bread is only going to keep for a couple days. That whole wheat recipe I posted above kept very well as sandwich bread for a good 3 days. Normally the day after baking I'm ready to toast white loaves, I'm quite picky about my sandwich bread. Generally when I make bread I find all sorts of uses to get it gone in 1 or 2 days. If I get desperate the leftovers are made into croutons which my 6yo just gobbles right up and those will keep for about a week after making. I do hate to let things go to waste.
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Re: yeast

Postby flgator » Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:06 am

PatchMomma, that leftover bread could be dried/dehydrated and used in a good'ol meatloaf or stuffing, or bread pudding. Making myself hungry, lol.
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Re: yeast

Postby Aahz » Wed Sep 26, 2012 12:33 pm

... or making breadcrumbs for use on top of casseroles and other things ...
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Re: yeast

Postby Starlady » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:45 pm

Wild yeast is everywhere, too. In 1991 I got a batch of sourdough started and kept it going until 3/2010 when we moved from FL to GA!

It's so easy, it's silly:
1 cup water,
1 cup flour
2 teaspoons sugar
mix well in the widest mouth non-metal bowl you have (you can even use an 8" glass brownie dish).

Cover with several layers of cheesecloth ( I used 6 layers of nylon tulle - it was all I had at the time) - enough to keep flies & direct sun out but let teeny yeast in.

Leave it outside in the open (not in deep shade but not direct sun, either) and mix it up gently just a bit every day. About day 3-4 it gets bubbly, for a 'light' sourdough you're done. For a strong taste, leave it out another day. Use 1 cup for your first loaf and add another cup each of water and flour to the orginal 'starter'. At that point you can bring it in, leave on counter a couple of days to get growing again, then refigerate till you need more. I wasn't baking bread every day so when I needed a cup, I took it out and let it come to room temp. If TSHTF and you are baking bread every day, just keep adding equal amounts flour/water as you remove and leave it on a counter, lightly covered - it won't go bad if you are using and replacing every day. If it goes bad, throw it out and start over. Easy-peasy!

I don't add salt to my sourdough bread, salt is used to temper the yeast and you don't want that in sourdough - unless you've left it outside a lot and the starter is very yeasty. Experiment!

The Sun Oven came in last week and I've seen great reviews on other websites about how great it is for bread.

Good luck, let me know if you have any questions.
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Re: yeast

Postby mrbrooks » Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:21 pm

Great info. Starlady. I think I will try it. I am assuming there is no reason that I would have issues if I added fresh herbs and or cheeses to it right before baking it right?
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